Summaries of Officers Feloniously Killed

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Note: Occasionally, the Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted Program is unable to publish summaries concerning some officers who are feloniously killed in the line of duty. These situations may stem from insufficient information, gag orders that are issued by the courts, or other unusual circumstances that may exist. Although a written summary of the death of one officer who was killed in 2008 is not included in this publication, all available information is included where applicable in the data tables.

Arizona

An officer with the Tucson Police Department (TPD) was shot and killed, and two deputy sheriffs with the Pima County Sheriff’s Department (PCSD) were injured as a result of a felony traffic pursuit on June 1 in Tucson. Shortly before 10 a.m., dispatchers with the PCSD received several calls about a man in camouflage clothing who was shooting at houses. Deputies were dispatched, arrived at the scene at 10:08 a.m., and obtained a description of the man’s vehicle. A 30-year-old PCSD deputy, with nearly 1 year of law enforcement experience, spotted the man’s vehicle. The suspect waved at the deputy and motioned for the deputy to come to him. The suspect then raised a 5.45x39 mm semiautomatic rifle and fired at the deputy, striking him in the left shoulder. The deputy returned fire with three rounds from his service weapon, a .40-caliber semiautomatic handgun. None of the rounds struck the suspect, who fled. The injured deputy attempted to pursue the suspect, but his marked police car sustained gunshot damage to the engine, making it inoperable. At 10:21 a.m., a sergeant with the TPD spotted the suspect’s vehicle, broadcast the vehicle’s location and description, and followed the vehicle. Several other officers from the TPD and the PCSD joined in the chase. As the suspect drove, he slung his weapon over his shoulder and fired at the officers. One shot hit the lead patrol car in the windshield. At 10:25 a.m., a 43-year-old TPD officer, with more than 4 years of law enforcement experience, was headed toward the suspect’s vehicle when he made a U-turn and joined the chase as the lead vehicle as several police units had backed off the chase. The suspect again slung his weapon over his shoulder and fired additional rounds. Officers had planned to put down spike strips at a nearby intersection, but the suspect stopped about 75 yards from the strips and fired at the officers. One round traveled through the windshield and dashboard, striking the victim officer, who was wearing body armor, above the left eye. The officer’s car rolled to a stop, and the suspect, still in his vehicle, fled. Deputies lost the suspect’s vehicle, but a 32-year-old PCSD deputy, with nearly 8 years of law enforcement experience, who was responding to the incident, saw the car, did a U-turn, and pursued the suspect. As the deputy rounded a blind corner, he was confronted by the suspect, who had stopped his vehicle in the traffic lane and was kneeling on the front seat, taking aim at the deputy. The suspect fired at least 22 times, striking the deputy, who was wearing body armor, on the side of the head, slightly injuring him. The suspect then traveled to a nearby campground where he stopped his vehicle and waited for officers to detain him. Officers arrested him without incident at 10:45 a.m. The fatally injured TPD officer was airlifted to a local hospital where he died of his injuries the next day. In all, the 25-year-old suspect fired 90 rounds at law enforcement officers. He had a prior criminal record and was known to use drugs. He was charged with First-Degree Murder of a Law Enforcement Officer, two counts of Attempted First-Degree Murder of a Law Enforcement Officer, three counts of Aggravated Assault on a Law Enforcement Officer, and two counts of Discharge of a Firearm at a Structure. The 32-year-old injured deputy returned to duty on June 6. At the time of this publication, it is unknown if the 30-year-old deputy returned to duty.

A 31-year-old agent with the U.S. Border Patrol, Yuma, was killed at 9:20 a.m. on January 19 while assisting in a felony traffic stop. The agent, who had 5½ years of law enforcement experience, was working undercover when he and his partners saw two vehicles exit sand dunes in a place common to illegal entries into the United States from Mexico. The officers suspected that the vehicles had entered illegally and positioned themselves to intercept them. The suspects in the vehicles saw the plain clothes unit and turned around to return to Mexico. The agent was attempting to deploy a controlled tire deflation device to stop one of the vehicles when the suspect accelerated his truck and swerved at the agent. Witnesses estimated that the suspect’s vehicle was traveling between 60 to 70 miles per hour when it struck the victim agent, causing multiple traumatic injuries to his head, chest, front below the waist, and his neck/throat. Agents on the scene began life-saving measures on the victim officer until emergency services could arrive. The emergency medical personnel pronounced the victim agent dead at the scene. Meanwhile, both suspects eluded capture and returned to Mexico. Numerous American and Mexican law enforcement agencies searched for the individuals, and the manhunt culminated in the capture of one of the suspects. The 42-year-old arrestee, a known drug dealer, was arrested in Mexico and at the time of this publication, was still in custody there for unrelated smuggling charges and was awaiting extradition to the United States to face trial in this case.

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California

Just after midnight on February 7, two police officers with the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) were shot—one fatally and one seriously injured—during a tactical situation at a residence. Hours earlier a man had made a 911 call indicating that he had shot at least three family members and did not want to kill more. Units responded, and staff communicating with the residence via the 911 line heard mumbling sounds that may have been a victim in peril in the background. The LAPD SWAT team was requested, and when the members arrived at the scene, an emergency rescue team was formed to make entry through the front door. The suspect fired shots from a .380-caliber semiautomatic handgun at the SWAT team as they attempted to make entry. A 51-year-old police officer with 27 years of law enforcement experience was fatally shot in the front of the head. Another 51-year-old officer with nearly 26 years of law enforcement experience was seriously injured when he was shot in the front of the head. Both victim officers were wearing protective body armor. During the hours following the initial attempt to enter the residence, there were multiple attempts to encourage the suspect to surrender. The confrontation between the 20-year-old suspect and the officers continued over the next several hours until the suspect was justifiably killed by an officer. The man had a prior criminal record including weapons violations and was a known user of narcotics.

A 13-year veteran sergeant with the Martinez Police Department (MPD) was shot and killed while answering a domestic disturbance call that became a tactical situation around 11:30 a.m. on September 6. The 47-year-old sergeant was the second responder on the scene at a beauty shop where an employee’s ex-husband had broken the front window to gain entrance and was making threats and displaying a weapon as he searched for his ex-wife, who had hidden in a storage closet. As another MPD officer and the sergeant arrived within seconds of each other, they heard shots from an upstairs apartment adjacent to the shop’s parking lot. The officers went up the stairs to an L-shaped hallway that had two apartments at the end with facing doors. They made their way down the hallway to a door that had been kicked in and from where they heard children and women screaming. Suddenly, the suspect extended his arm out of the open doorway and shot around the front door with a .38-caliber revolver. One of the two rounds shot by the suspect struck the victim sergeant in the neck above his protective vest, and the sergeant fell to the floor. Both officers returned fire. The suspect began firing again, and the MPD officer continued to return fire as he attempted to pull the fallen sergeant to safety. Several of the rounds fired by the officer struck the suspect through the door. Arriving back-up officers gave additional cover as the officer dragged the sergeant from the scene. A K-9 unit was among the arriving officers, and a corporal from that unit sent his dog into the residence. The dog bit the suspect in the leg as the corporal approached the suspect, who was still armed. The corporal fired two rounds at the 49-year-old suspect, who was justifiably killed at the scene. (It was later determined that the victim sergeant actually fired the round that ultimately proved fatal to the shooter.) The victim sergeant was transported to a local hospital where he died the same day. Inside the apartment, MPD officers found three children, two adults, and one deceased female, who was another victim of the shooter.

A 37-year-old deputy sheriff with the Yolo County Sheriff’s Department was fatally shot shortly after 9:30 p.m. on June 15 while attempting to make a traffic stop in Dunnigan. Earlier in the evening, about 7:15 p.m., a dispatcher advised of a possible drunk driver with an infant in the vehicle and also provided a vehicle description and license plate number. Around 9:30 p.m., the deputy, who had nearly 4 years of law enforcement experience, spotted the vehicle and attempted to stop it. However, the driver refused to pull over. The deputy advised all units that he was in pursuit and that the suspect vehicle was traveling at a high rate of speed. A few minutes later, the suspect stopped the vehicle and fled on foot. Moments later, the deputy called for emergency backup and reported “officer down.” Several units arrived on the scene within minutes and found the deputy with a gunshot wound to his chest. A powerful round from a .223-caliber semiautomatic rifle had penetrated his protective vest. The victim deputy sheriff was treated by emergency personnel and transported to a local hospital, where he died later that day. Following an extensive manhunt, the 35-year-old suspect was located and arrested on June 16. The man, who was on parole at the time of the incident and who had a prior criminal record that included violent crime, drugs, police assault, and weapons violations, was charged with Murder.

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Florida

A 30-year-old police officer with the Fort Myers Police Department, who had just over a year of law enforcement experience, was shot and killed when he responded to a disturbance call shortly after 2 a.m. on July 18. The officer, who was wearing body armor, and another officer approached two men fighting in front of a home. As the officers approached the scene of the altercation, one of the men produced a 9 mm semiautomatic handgun and shot the victim officer in the right side of his face, killing him instantly. The other officer returned fire as the gunman attempted to flee. The offender also fired at other officers who had arrived at the scene. In the ensuing exchange of gunfire, the victim officer’s partner shot and killed the 26-year-old offender, who was on probation and under the influence of alcohol at the time of the incident. Unknown to the officers at the time, the man had been fighting with his girlfriend earlier in the evening and had threatened to shoot her. The man had a prior criminal record that included violent crime, drugs, and weapons violations.

On July 22 approximately 8:40 a.m., a 33-year-old deputy sheriff with the Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office (OCSO) was shot and killed while participating in a tactical situation in Fort Walton Beach involving a man whose family was attempting to have him placed in a hospital for psychiatric examination. The man had suffered some mental problems since the death of his father several months prior to the incident on July 22. His family had attempted twice on the previous day to have him involuntarily placed under psychiatric observation, but he had left the hospital twice on his own. He had proven to be verbally abusive and uncooperative to law enforcement and hospital staff involved in both episodes. After the second time he left the hospital, he returned to his father’s house. A family friend in the neighborhood reported contact with the man to his family, and neighbors reported seeing suspicious activity near the property in the very early hours of July 22. They notified authorities that someone appeared to be in the vacant house. When OCSO deputies arrived on the scene, the man’s brother was waiting in a pickup truck at the house. He informed the deputies he and his companion could hear his brother moving about in the house and that his brother had a shotgun in his possession. Deputies searched the area around the residence, set up a perimeter, and attempted to make contact with the man. A second brother of the man arrived on the scene, confirmed that his brother was armed, and provided a key and gave consent for the deputies to enter the residence. At 4:20 a.m., both a Special Response Team (SRT) and a Crisis Negotiation Unit were called out. Details of the case were discussed and further information dispersed, including that the man was no longer in possession of a mobile phone and the house had no phone service. After further efforts to contact the man failed, the decision was made to send in the SRT using a “stealth” entry and quietly conduct a welfare check on the man. The SRT entered with the key and, initially, behind a ballistic shield. The team then moved slowly and methodically through the rooms of the house. The victim deputy, who had 4 years of law enforcement experience, began to search a second bedroom. As the victim deputy and another deputy began to slowly open the door to the room, the second deputy saw a muzzle flash and heard a shot right before the victim deputy fell backwards. The second deputy returned fire. As the second deputy moved, he observed the shooter crossing the room with a 12-gauge pump-action shotgun. The deputy continued to fire as the suspect dove into a closet. The deputy moved a little further into the doorway and saw the suspect lying on the floor of the closet. Officers began administering aid to the victim deputy who was mortally wounded in the neck above his protective vest. Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel transported the deputy to an area hospital where he was pronounced dead on arrival. The EMS also evaluated the condition of the suspect and established that he was dead on the scene. Laboratory analysis later determined that, although the 47-year-old suspect suffered several wounds, the fatal shot was a self-inflicted one from his own shotgun.

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Georgia

Two police officers with the DeKalb County Police Department were shot and killed while investigating suspicious circumstances at 12:3o a.m. on January 16. The two officers had just completed their regular work shift and were working as police security at an apartment complex. The 26-year-old police officer, with over 1 year of law enforcement experience, arrived on the scene first and observed a suspicious vehicle. He approached it and began questioning the driver. During this time, several other individuals appeared around the vehicle. The 34-year-old officer, with over 4 years of law enforcement experience, arrived shortly thereafter and immediately came to the passenger’s side of the vehicle in question. While questioning one of the individuals, a struggle ensued between the 34-year-old officer and the man. The 26-year-old officer came around the vehicle to assist. As the suspect fell to the ground, he produced a .40-caliber semiautomatic handgun and began firing at both officers. The 34-year-old officer, who was wearing body armor, received shots to his arms/hands, the side of his head, and fatally to the front of his head. He died at the scene. The 26-year-old officer received shots that entered below his waist and fatally in his front lower torso/abdomen below his protective vest. He died en route to an area hospital. A manhunt ensued that included numerous local, state, and federal agencies. A 26-year-old male was arrested on January 18 and was charged with two counts of Murder of a Law Enforcement Officer, Probation Violation, and Marijuana Possession.

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Illinois

Approximately 2 a.m. on July 2, a 60-year-old police officer with the Chicago Police Department was shot and killed while attempting to make an arrest. The 27-year veteran of law enforcement was flagged down by a Chicago Transit Authority bus driver who requested that the police officer assist him with a woman causing a disturbance on his bus. When the police officer, who was wearing body armor, approached the woman, a struggle ensued, and both fell to the ground. During the struggle, the woman grabbed the police officer’s .38-caliber revolver and shot him in the front of the head. She then used the same gun to shoot at responding officers. Those officers returned fire, hitting and wounding the woman. The victim police officer was transported to a local hospital where he was pronounced dead. The 44-year-old offender, who was a known drug user with prior mental disorders, was also taken to a local hospital for medical attention and then arrested and charged with First-Degree Murder.

A 14-year veteran police officer with the Chicago Police Department was killed on September 28 as he and several other officers were attempting to serve a search warrant at a residence. Just after 5:30 a.m., the subject of the warrant arrived at the residence. As the 39-year-old officer, who was working undercover, approached the individual, the man fired four rounds from a .38-caliber revolver. Three rounds struck the officer in the arms/hands and fatally in the front of the head. Other officers returned fire, striking and injuring the shooter. The victim officer was taken to a local hospital where he died later that day of his injuries. The 37-year-old suspect, who had prior convictions for violent crimes, drugs, and weapons violations, was arrested and charged with First-Degree Murder.

A 29-year law enforcement veteran died on November 4 at the age of 53 as a result of injuries he sustained during a tactical situation around 10 a.m. on August 28, 2001. The detective with the Chicago Police Department was part of an arrest team that included federal task force officers and FBI agents who were looking for a bank robbery suspect. The team converged on the apartment of the suspect’s girlfriend. During the arrest attempt in the back bedroom of the apartment, the suspect shot the veteran detective, who was wearing a protective vest, in the side of the head with a .44-caliber semiautomatic handgun at close range. The shooter then fired the same weapon and a .45-caliber semiautomatic pistol at agents in the living room. The agents returned fire, striking the shooter, but he continued firing at the agents, who were forced to retreat into the hallway. After 2 hours of negotiations, a SWAT team entered the apartment and took the man into custody. The 41-year-old offender, who had a prior criminal record that included violent crime and weapons violations, was charged with Attempted Murder. The detective was taken to a local hospital. He was in a coma as a result of the gunshot wound, and he never regained consciousness.

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Kentucky

On January 10 at 12:53 a.m., a deputy sheriff with the Bell County Sheriff’s Office was killed in Pineville while assisting two state troopers in a traffic pursuit. The troopers were attempting to stop a speeding vehicle, but the driver refused to pull over. Instead, the driver sped away, sometimes reaching speeds in excess of 110 mph in the ensuing chase. One of the trooper’s vehicles was equipped with a video camera that captured the entire incident. The speeding car left the southbound lane several times and traveled southward in the northbound lane, forcing several vehicles off the roadway. The troopers were in contact with the Bell County dispatcher, and they requested assistance, asking for a tire deflation device to be deployed. The assisting deputy sheriff, who was 31 years old and who had more than 10 years of law enforcement experience, responded to the call. He parked his patrol car at the entrance to a county garage facility, facing the northbound highway. Apparently, when the fleeing suspect neared this location, he accelerated his vehicle across the lanes of the highway again and deliberately headed toward the deputy’s vehicle. The man, still driving the car south, crossed the center line, the other lane of the northbound roadway, and the northbound asphalt shoulder. He drove the vehicle across a patch of grass and gravel and an asphalt access road and struck the deputy’s vehicle at a high rate of speed. The assailant’s vehicle deeply penetrated the passenger side of the deputy’s car, fatally injuring the victim deputy. The deputy’s K-9 partner was also killed in the collision. The 17-year-old assailant, who had a prior criminal record, was arrested and charged with Murder of a Law Enforcement Officer and First-Degree Assault of a Service Animal. The second occupant in the vehicle, a 16-year-old male, was also arrested in connection with the incident and charged with Facilitation to Commit Murder and Facilitation to Commit First-Degree Assault on a Service Animal.

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Louisiana

A 25-year veteran deputy sheriff with the Lafourche Parish Sheriff’s Office was struck by a vehicle and killed at 2:30 a.m. on August 20 when she responded to a burglary in progress call at a convenience store in Chackbay. The 53-year-old deputy, who was accompanied by the store’s owner, had confronted the burglary suspect and was attempting to detain him when she was hit by the stolen pickup in which he was escaping. The deputy, who was wearing body armor, fatally suffered a broken neck and major internal injuries. The 41-year-old suspect, who had a long list of prior offenses, including murder, was apprehended and arrested the same day by the Louisiana State Police. He was charged with First-Degree Murder, Attempted First-Degree Murder, Simple Burglary, and Unauthorized Use of a Vehicle.

A 24-year-old police officer with the New Orleans Police Department was shot and killed with her service weapon while investigating a suspicious person on January 28. At 10 a.m., the officer, with 2½ years of law enforcement experience, identified a person with whom she had had previous law enforcement contact who was seated on the curb in the parking lot of a two-store strip mall. She parked her marked police car at an angle, placing the suspect and herself between the police car and the store building. Upon exiting her vehicle, she walked towards the man and spoke to him and then grabbed his shoulder. The man batted away her hand. The officer again reached toward the man, and he lunged forward, tackling her against the patrol car, and they both fell to the ground. While the struggle continued, the officer attempted to request backup; however, the radio was set to a non-dispatch talk frequency. The man obtained control of the officer’s baton from her duty belt and struck her in the head. He then removed her .40-caliber semiautomatic service handgun. The suspect disengaged from the struggle and fired the gun at close range at the officer. He shot the police officer 15 times in the front and side of the head, rear lower torso/back, arms/hands, and fatally in the rear upper torso/back. The fatal bullet traveled between the side panels of her protective vest. The 44-year-old suspect, who had a prior criminal record including violent crime, remained by the officer’s body, still holding the gun in his hand, until responding officers arrived. He was arrested and charged with First-Degree Murder. The victim officer was transported to a local hospital where she was pronounced dead. The entire incident was captured on video surveillance cameras owned by the stores in the strip mall.

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Maryland

Around 11:40 a.m. on June 27, a 39-year-old sergeant with the Prince George’s County Police Department (PGCPD) was struck and killed in Laurel by a vehicle driven by a fleeing suspect. The 10-year veteran of law enforcement, along with an assisting corporal with the PGCPD, had approached a suspicious vehicle that appeared to have stolen Virginia plates. The sergeant had parked his marked vehicle to prevent the driver of the suspicious truck from exiting the space in the apartment complex where it was parked. The sergeant exited his cruiser and walked toward the suspect vehicle. Suddenly, the driver accelerated the truck (later determined to be stolen from a local dealership) toward the sergeant. The sergeant discharged his service weapon six times, and four of the rounds struck the vehicle. The driver kept accelerating, struck the victim sergeant, and dragged him over 200 feet before fleeing the scene. The sergeant was transported to an area hospital, but the multiple injuries that he suffered proved fatal. The stolen truck was found abandoned in another area of the city, and the 19-year-old suspect was located later that same day. He was arrested and charged with First-Degree Murder. The suspect was subsequently found unconscious in his jail cell and later died. The cause of death had not been determined at the time of this report.

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Michigan

Around 12:30 a.m. on December 28, a 28-year-old public safety officer with the Oak Park Department of Public Safety was shot and killed while attempting an arrest. Shortly before the incident, the officer had stopped a vehicle for a traffic violation and had identified the operator as a 16-year-old unlicensed driver. The juvenile told the officer that he lived in the apartment complex near where they were stopped, so the officer took the juvenile to the complex in an attempt to turn him over to a parent. After arriving there, however, the officer determined that the residence was that of the juvenile’s 15-year-old girlfriend. The officer, who was wearing body armor and who had 3½ years of law enforcement experience, then attempted to arrest the juvenile. A struggle ensued during which the juvenile disarmed the officer and shot him in the side of the head with the service weapon, a .40-caliber semiautomatic handgun. The victim officer immediately died from the injury, and the juvenile fled the scene. The 16-year-old assailant, who had a prior criminal record and was on conditional release at the time of the incident, was arrested later that day and charged with First-Degree Murder, Homicide of a Law Enforcement Officer, and 2 counts of Felony with a Firearm.

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Missouri

A sergeant and a patrol officer with the Kirkwood Police Department were shot and killed during unprovoked attacks on February 7. Just before 7 p.m., a 50-year-old sergeant with over 20 years of law enforcement experience was picking up his evening meal at a restaurant less than a block away from Kirkwood City Hall. The veteran sergeant was approached at the rear entrance of the restaurant by a man who is believed to have asked him a question. Apparently, the offender surprised the sergeant with a .44-caliber revolver and shot him in the side of the head. Prior to being shot, the sergeant had pressed the emergency button on his portable radio to alert dispatchers that he needed assistance. He died at the scene. The suspect then stole the victim sergeant’s gun and quickly proceeded to the city hall where a city council meeting was being held. He entered the building wearing a sign that he had used previously to demonstrate his dislike for the council members. The suspect walked up the steps, entered council chambers, and walked down the aisle adjacent to where a 37-year-old patrol officer, who was on a duty assignment as the city council security officer, was seated. The man approached the patrol officer as if to ask a question; instead, however, he drew a revolver from under his sign and shot the veteran officer, who had more than 10 years of law enforcement experience, fatally in the side of his head. The 52-year-old male then shot and killed two council members and a city employee, and he wounded the mayor and a newspaper reporter. The suspect, who had a prior criminal record that included violent crime, was justifiably killed by responding officers.

Around 10:20 p.m. on October 31, a 50-year-old sergeant with the University City Police Department was shot and killed in an ambush situation. According to witnesses, the sergeant was sitting in his police cruiser when a man ran up to the vehicle and fired five rounds. The 25-year veteran of law enforcement was hit fatally in the front upper torso/chest area by a round that entered through the armhole/shoulder area of his protective gear. Shots from the suspect’s .38-caliber revolver also hit the victim sergeant in the side of his head and in his arms/hands. Following the shooting, the suspect fled the scene in a vehicle and officers pursued him. Although he escaped that evening, the suspect was captured in the Kansas City (Missouri) area on November 4. The 41-year-old man, known to the police as a drug dealer and user with prior convictions, was arrested and charged with First-Degree Murder and Felon in Possession of a Firearm.

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North Carolina

A 24-year-old trooper with the North Carolina Highway Patrol, Asheville, was shot and killed during a traffic stop in Canton about 10:20 p.m. on June 17. The trooper, who had 2 years of law enforcement experience, stopped a vehicle for a registration violation. The trooper approached the vehicle and asked the driver to step out. The man complied and walked with the trooper to the front of the patrol vehicle. After questioning the man for a few minutes, the trooper asked the man if he minded being frisked. The man asked the trooper what being frisked meant, and the trooper explained that it was to check for weapons. The man told the trooper that he had a gun, and a struggle ensued. The man produced a 9 mm semiautomatic handgun and fired three shots from close range, striking the trooper in his back, his arms/hands, and fatally in his chest, where a bullet entered above his protective vest. The shooter took the trooper’s weapon, returned to his vehicle, and drove away. However, numerous 911 calls were received from witnesses that led officers to the man where he was apprehended a short distance from the scene. The 37-year-old man, who was a known drug user and who had a prior criminal record that included arrests for drugs, police assault, and weapons violations, was charged with First-Degree Murder, Armed Robbery, Felon with a Firearm, and Possession of Controlled Substance.

Just before 10:15 p.m. on September 19, a deputy with the Caldwell County Sheriff’s Office (CCSO) was shot and killed and a CCSO lieutenant was shot and injured in an ambush situation in Lenoir. In response to a 911 hang up call, the 25-year-old deputy, with 1 year’s law enforcement experience, arrived at a residence around 9:40 p.m. and began to investigate. Minutes later, he reported to communications that he had discovered an open door to the residence. Further investigation revealed a domestic dispute between a man and a woman. The woman was still inside the residence with three children, but the man had left the home, possibly armed, and had gone into the surrounding area. At 9:55 p.m., the deputy, who was wearing body armor, requested assistance from dispatch and began canvassing the immediate area. At 10:11 p.m., the 30-year-old lieutenant and an assisting deputy arrived on the scene. As they approached in their patrol unit, they saw the responding deputy standing near the rear of his patrol vehicle, and then, as they drove closer, they saw the victim deputy lying on the ground, mortally wounded. At that time, the officers were fired upon by multiple rounds. The lieutenant, a 7-year veteran of law enforcement, was hit in the front upper torso/chest from over 50 feet away. His protective vest stopped the round, but he sustained bruising and burning on his chest. The lieutenant then returned fire as he and the assisting deputy exited their patrol unit and sought cover. Additional officers responded to the scene, evacuated the victim deputy and the victim lieutenant, and drove them to an intersection where an ambulance waited to transport them to a local hospital. There, the victim deputy was pronounced dead from a gunshot wound to the front of the head from a .223-caliber semiautomatic rifle, and the victim lieutenant was treated and released. Following a 5-day manhunt, the 32-year-old suspect was found dead of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound. The victim lieutenant has since returned to duty.

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Ohio

A 36-year-old patrol officer with the Cleveland Division of Police was shot while investigating suspicious persons at 6:25 p.m. on February 29. The veteran officer, who had more than 9 years of law enforcement experience, and his partner were on patrol when they observed what appeared to be a drug transaction taking place between a man in a vehicle and a man in front of an abandoned house. The officers also saw five men on the porch of the house. When the men saw the officers, they jumped off the porch and began to walk away. The officers pursued them on foot, but the men scattered in different directions. The veteran officer chased one male up a driveway and was approximately 3 to 4 feet away from him when the man turned and fired several shots from a .44-caliber revolver. A round struck the victim officer fatally in the abdomen below his protective vest. Before collapsing on the ground, the officer shot at the suspect twice with his service weapon, a 9 mm semiautomatic handgun, and yelled to his partner to go after the suspect. The victim officer’s partner ran up the next driveway, and the suspect reappeared and fired two or three rounds at the officer’s partner. The partner fired six rounds at the 19-year-old suspect, who then fled the area. The victim officer was transported to a hospital, where he succumbed to his injuries on March 1. The suspect turned himself in to the Cleveland Division of Police on March 3 and was charged with Aggravated Murder.

Shortly before 2 a.m. on July 13, a 33-year-old patrol officer with the Twinsburg Police Department was fatally shot while he was attempting to make an arrest. The veteran officer, who had nearly 12½ years of law enforcement experience, made a traffic stop and radioed for a back-up unit. A few minutes later, a resident in the area of the traffic stop called the Twinsburg dispatcher to report hearing individuals arguing and popping sounds. Additional officers arrived at the scene and found the patrol officer lying on the ground near his vehicle, and his K-9 partner was still in the vehicle. The officers pulled the victim patrol officer, who was wearing body armor, across the street to a safer area and attempted to provide medical aid to the officer’s wounds to the front and side of his head and to his neck. He was flown by helicopter to a local hospital, where he died a short time later from the gunshot wound to the front of his head from a 9 mm semiautomatic handgun. Officers located a 26-year-old suspect, who still had one handcuff on his wrist, in a nearby community and arrested him. He was charged with two counts each of Aggravated Murder, Escape, and Resisting Arrest, one count of Carrying Concealed Weapons, and three counts of Tampering with Evidence.

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Oregon

Around 5:25 p.m. on December 12, a captain with the Woodburn Police Department (WPD) and a senior trooper with the Oregon State Police (OSP), Salem, were killed in a bomb blast while investigating an attempted bank extortion in Woodburn. The chief of the WPD was also injured in the blast. Earlier that day, the 51-year-old captain and the 46-year-old chief, both from WPD, as well as agents from the OSP, responded to the first of two banks involved. There, a hoax bomb device and a throw away cell phone were located in the bank’s dumpster and seized as evidence. Because an anonymous male caller referenced a second bank during the extortion attempt, investigators reported to the second bank after searching the first one. A metal box located in the bushes around the second bank was deemed by bank personnel to belong to the gardener, and since investigating officers found nothing else, the scene was cleared around noon. However, when the gardener arrived at the bank at 4 p.m., he advised that the metal box did not belong to him. Police were again summoned to the bank along with bomb squad personnel, one of whom was a 51-year-old senior trooper/bomb technician of the OSP with over 11 years’ law enforcement experience. The bomb technician x-rayed the box and determined that it was a hoax device. During the investigation, the WPD captain and chief who had been on the scene earlier in the day also arrived. Around 5:25 p.m., the OSP bomb technician took the metal box inside the bank due to a severe rainstorm. When the bomb technician attempted to manually open the box, it exploded, killing him and the WPD captain, who had more than 28 years of law enforcement experience. The men died of fatal wounds to multiple locations of their bodies. The WPD chief, who had more than 20 years of law enforcement experience, also sustained serious life-threatening injuries. He was transported to a hospital where one of his legs was amputated. Meanwhile, the bomb scene was secured as a homicide scene and the investigation intensified. On December 14, a police officer from the Keizer Police Department and one from the OSP apprehended a 32-year-old suspect at his home. The man had a criminal record with prior convictions, probation, and parole. He was arrested and charged with six counts of Capital Murder, two counts of Attempted Aggravated Murder, First-Degree Assault, Second-Degree Assault, Possession of Explosive Device, Manufacture of an Explosive Device, and Conspiracy to Commit Crimes. A few days later, a 57-year-old male was also arrested in connection with the case and charged with six counts of Aggravated Murder, two counts of Attempted Murder, First-Degree Assault, and Possession of Explosive Device. The WPD chief continues his rehabilitation and has returned to duty part-time as of publication.

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Pennsylvania

A sergeant with the Philadelphia Police Department was killed at 11:28 a.m. on May 3 while responding to a radio call of an armed robbery at a bank inside a store. The 39-year-old sergeant, who had more than 11 years of law enforcement experience, spotted a vehicle that matched the description of the vehicle used in the robbery and pursued it. The vehicle stopped, and a male exited the car and fired an unknown number of shots at the sergeant with a 7.62x39 mm semiautomatic rifle, striking him several times in the chest, legs, arms, and fatally in the front lower torso/abdomen. The victim sergeant was transported to the hospital, where he was pronounced dead at 12:14 p.m. The 34-year-old offender, who had a prior criminal record for violent crime, was justifiably killed by another officer investigating the incident.

Around 2 p.m. on September 23, a 30-year-old police officer with the Philadelphia Police Department was shot and killed while investigating a suspicious person. At 1:47 p.m., the officer stopped a vehicle with a female driver and a male passenger. Within moments, the male passenger exited the vehicle to leave the scene, and the 8-year veteran officer pursued the man on foot around the corner of the block. Shortly thereafter, the man shot the officer at close range with a .45-caliber semiautomatic handgun, striking him in the front upper torso/chest several times. The victim officer managed to fire one shot from his own weapon, but he did not hit his assailant. As the shooter attempted to flee the area, he quickly encountered another officer with whom he exchanged gunfire. The 35-year-old assisting officer, a veteran of law enforcement with over 10 years’ law enforcement experience, was shot in the hip. The offender, who had been hit with three of the four shots fired by the assisting officer, soon collapsed from gunshot wounds in his head and chest. The 30-year-old officer was pronounced dead at the scene, as was his assailant. The 35-year-old assisting officer was transported to a hospital and later released. He did not return to duty. The 27-year-old offender was wanted at the time of the incident for aggravated assault and parole violation, and he had an extensive criminal record of violent crime, police assault, and weapons violations.

A special agent with the FBI Pittsburgh Field Office was shot and killed at 6 a.m. on November 19 while attempting to serve an arrest warrant at a residence in Indiana Township. The 33-year-old agent, who had more than 6 years of law enforcement experience, was part of a multi-agency arrest team that had been investigating a man at the residence. Members of the team knocked on the home’s front door and rang the doorbell. The suspect approached the front door, was advised of the law enforcement’s presence, and notified that the officers had a warrant for his arrest. The man did not open the door; instead, he ran in the other direction. The arrest team initiated a forced entry using a battering ram to open the door and enter the house. While officers were using the ram, they repeated several times that they were police. After the ram successfully opened the door, the special agent was the first officer to enter the residence. As he entered, the individual’s wife fired a single round from a .38-caliber revolver. The round struck the agent in the front upper torso/chest above the bulletproof vest he was wearing. The agent was taken to a local hospital where he was pronounced dead. The 40-year-old woman was arrested and charged with Murder of a Federal Agent, Assault by Use of a Dangerous Weapon, Use of a Firearm in a Crime of Violence, Aiding the Possession of a Firearm by a Convicted Felon, Drug Conspiracy, Possession with Intent to Deliver More than 50 Grams of Cocaine Base, Possession with Intent to Deliver Cocaine, and Possession of a Firearm While Using Unlawful Controlled Substances. She was known to use, deal, and possess drugs, and she was under the influence of narcotics at the time of the incident.

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South Carolina

Approximately 3 a.m. on August 6, a 39-year-old deputy sheriff with the Colleton County Sheriff’s Office was shot and killed when he responded to a burglary in progress. The deputy, who had 2 years of law enforcement experience, arrived at the residence located in the community of Smoaks. The deputy was approaching the house via the carport when he suddenly was confronted by two suspects exiting the home through a kitchen door that led onto the same carport. One of the suspects fired two shots at the deputy from a 12-gauge pump-action shotgun, and one of the shots struck the victim deputy in the lower abdomen, just below his protective vest. The victim deputy died at the scene. The burglars fled the area before additional deputies arrived. In the ensuing investigation, officers arrested two suspects on September 5. The first suspect, a 19-year-old male with a prior criminal history, was charged with Murder, 4 counts of First-Degree Burglary, and 1 count of Second-Degree Burglary. The second suspect, an 18-year-old male who was on probation at the time of the incident, was also charged with Murder, 3 counts of First-Degree Burglary, and Second-Degree Burglary.

A 16-year veteran of law enforcement was killed at 1:35 a.m. on May 3 while attempting an arrest in Holly Hill. The 46-year-old corporal with the Orangeburg County Sheriff’s Office had been dispatched to escort a woman in retrieving her belongings from her home following a domestic altercation with her husband. On the way to the residence, the corporal was notified that there was an active warrant for failure to appear for the woman’s husband. The woman, her sister, and the corporal arrived at the home in two separate cars. A visitor answered the door, and the corporal told the visitor why he was there. As the women retrieved the belongings, a man from a nearby residence, who was dressed only in boxer shorts, approached the corporal. Witnesses confirmed to the corporal that the man was the woman’s husband. The corporal told the man to put on some clothes and that the corporal had a warrant for his arrest. The husband asked if he could talk to his wife, but the corporal denied his request and again told the man to put on some clothes. The man entered the home to dress. In the meantime, the women had finished gathering the possessions and were waiting in their car for the corporal, who was on the front porch talking to witnesses with his back partially to the door of the home. As the man approached, the corporal, who was wearing body armor, began to turn. The man fired a single shot at close range from a 12-gauge pump-action shotgun, fatally striking the corporal in the neck. The man then jumped off the front porch of the home and attempted to shoot his wife, who was in the passenger side of the car. Her sister, who was driving, tried to escape the man. She put the car in reverse and accelerated as she tried to leave the area; in doing so, she unknowingly struck the man and another witness who was attempting to tackle him. The women called 911 and reported the incident. Additional units arrived, and officers discovered the victim corporal on the ground in front of the porch. Emergency personnel declared the corporal dead on the scene. Officers located the 41-year-old man in a ditch dead from injuries he sustained from being struck by the car. The man, who had prior convictions for violent crime, was under the influence of narcotics and was on conditional release at the time of the incident.

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Tennessee

A deputy sheriff with the Grundy County Sheriff’s Office was killed and a patrol officer with the Monteagle Police Department was injured while attempting to arrest an individual at approximately 3 a.m. on June 5 in Monteagle. The 29-year-old deputy had nearly 3 years of law enforcement experience, and the 23-year-old patrol officer had 2 years of law enforcement experience. The pair, along with a reserve police officer, were at a residence to serve an individual with a warrant for a misdemeanor violation of probation. The deputy went to the front door of the residence, and the patrol officer and reserve officer went to the back door. The man let the deputy inside and then asked if he could change clothes, and the deputy agreed. The man went into a rear bedroom, and the deputy remained in the living room with the man’s girlfriend. The deputy asked the woman if the man had a gun, and she acknowledged that he did. The deputy, who was wearing body armor, then went to the bedroom. As he crossed the threshold to the room, the man fired a shot at the deputy from a .38-caliber revolver, striking the deputy at close range fatally in the right temple. The suspect took the deputy’s service weapon, a 9 mm semiautomatic handgun, and fled. Outside, the patrol officer heard the scuffle and attempted to go to the front door but tripped and fell in the dark in the yard of the residence. As the suspect was fleeing, he fired two rounds, one of which struck the patrol officer in the right side of the torso when the bullet entered through the armhole area of his protective vest. The reserve officer called for assistance and emergency aid, and the wounded patrol officer was taken to a local hospital where he was treated and released and then returned to duty the next day. The suspect fled into a wooded area behind the residence armed with the revolver, a 12-gauge shotgun, and the deputy sheriff’s service weapon. After an extensive search by local, state, and federal agencies from three states, officers found the suspect in a wooded area near a local cemetery. Attempts to negotiate with the suspect were unsuccessful. At approximately 6:55 p.m., the 29-year-old suspect committed suicide by shooting himself in the head. The suspect was on probation at the time of the incident and had prior convictions for drugs.

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Texas

A 56-year-old corporal with the Harris County Constable’s Office was shot with his backup weapon at 2:30 p.m. on January 26 while handling a prisoner in Houston. The corporal, who had 12½ years of law enforcement experience, was working off-duty at an apartment complex when he stopped an individual in the parking lot of the complex and placed the individual in custody in the back seat of the corporal’s unmarked patrol car. The individual was able to open the sliding partition between the front and rear seats and retrieve the corporal’s backup weapon, a .40-caliber semiautomatic handgun, from the front seat. It is not known if the corporal had handcuffed the suspect with his hands in the front or if the individual was able to slide his legs through his arms after being handcuffed with his hands in the back. The individual, still handcuffed with his hands in the front, fired nine shots with the handgun at the corporal from close range, striking the corporal in the front below his protective vest and also in the neck/throat. Despite being critically injured, the corporal was able to fire 18 rounds from his service weapon, a .40-caliber semiautomatic handgun. Seven rounds hit the 21-year-old suspect, killing him. The corporal was taken to a local hospital where he died of the bullet wound to his neck on February 20.

At 8:41 a.m. on December 7, a veteran police officer with the Houston Police Department was killed in an unprovoked attack. The 43-year-old officer, who had more than 10½ years of law enforcement experience, was conducting a traffic stop. The driver of the vehicle pulled into the parking lot of an apartment complex, exited his car, and fled into the complex. The officer entered the car’s license plate information into his mobile data terminal and then followed the man into the complex but lost sight of him. The individual apparently hid from the officer in a front patio area of a vacant apartment and saw the officer run past him, giving the man the opportunity to ambush the officer. The man fired four rounds from a .40-caliber semiautomatic handgun. The officer, who was wearing body armor, was struck once in the throat, causing him to fall. The shooter then walked to the victim officer, stood over him, and fired another round into his head, killing him. The suspect then fled the scene in the suspect’s vehicle. At 8:43 a.m., residents of the apartment complex called 911 to report shots being fired, and one caller reported that an officer had been shot. Responding patrol units found the victim officer with his unholstered weapon under his body and his microphone in hand. The victim officer was taken to a local hospital where he was pronounced dead. Witnesses were able to provide some license plate information on the suspect’s vehicle, which matched the data from the victim officer’s mobile data terminal. Investigators used this information to locate the vehicle at 9:10 a.m. at a residence in an unincorporated area of Harris County. Local, county, and state officers surrounded the residence. The 28-year-old suspect, who had a long criminal history including arrests for police assault, violent crime, and drugs, attempted to flee the area on foot. Officers caught him after a short pursuit and took him to the local police station where he confessed to the murder. He was charged with Capital Murder of a Law Enforcement Officer.

A trooper with the Department of Public Safety, Jefferson, was shot and killed during a traffic pursuit at 8 p.m. on April 29. The 39-year-old trooper, who had more than 4½ years of law enforcement experience, was wearing body armor while pursuing a car in Jefferson. The trooper had given dispatchers identifying information about the vehicle, which was occupied by a male driver and a female passenger, and requested assistance. After turning onto another roadway, the driver abruptly stopped, exited the vehicle, pulled out a 20-gauge pump-action shotgun, and fired five rounds at the trooper, who had not yet completely stopped his vehicle. Two rounds struck the trooper, one in the side of the head and another fatally in the front of the head. The suspect then fled the scene with his female passenger. A manhunt ensued that lasted for 3 days and involved multiple local, state, and federal agencies. As troopers moved in, the suspect committed suicide by shooting himself in the head. The 37-year-old suspect had an extensive list of prior convictions and was on parole. He was also known to use and possess drugs and was under the influence of narcotics at the time of his death. The female passenger was later charged with Hindering Apprehension and Failure to Report a Felony.

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Virginia

On January 17 at 8:35 p.m., a 34-year-old detective with the Special Investigation Unit of the Chesapeake Police Department was killed while assisting in the serving of a search warrant at the home of a suspect. The officers involved in the tactical situation knocked on the man’s door and identified themselves as officers and announced their purpose at least twice. The man refused to let them in, so the officers attempted to force open the door. While the teams were trying to force their way in, the suspect fired two shots from a .380-caliber semiautomatic handgun. The victim detective, who had 8 years of law enforcement experience, was struck in his arms/hands, and one round entered through the armhole or shoulder area of his protective vest and struck him fatally in the chest. Other detectives moved the victim detective to a safe location and began life saving measures. He was transported to a local hospital where he was pronounced dead at approximately 9:15 p.m. After the victim detective was shot, the suspect, a 28-year-old man who had a prior criminal record involving drugs, was arrested and charged with First-Degree Murder, Use of a Firearm in Commission of a Felony, and Possession of Marijuana.

A 40-year-old officer with the Fredericksburg Police Department was shot and killed on June 6 during a felony traffic stop. Just after 11 p.m., a citizen reported that her former companion had been in the stairwell of her apartment building with a gun. An alert was issued and his vehicle was located in a nearby shopping center. When police approached, the man fled in his vehicle and headed directly to the apartment complex where the complainant lived. The man bailed out of his vehicle and ran behind an apartment building near a wooded area. The officer, who had nearly 2 years of law enforcement experience, ran in one direction, and a second officer ran in the opposite direction around the building. The second officer heard shots fired, and the suspect was then heard running through the wooded area towards the apartment building where the complainant lived. The suspect fired several shots at vehicles and police officers. As police were commanding him to drop his weapon, the suspect continued to shoot and then attempted to reload the weapon. After the suspect reloaded, police returned fire, and the 47-year-old suspect fatally shot himself in the head with his .380-caliber semiautomatic handgun, the same gun used to shoot the victim officer. A sergeant on the scene found the victim officer, who was wearing body armor, in the wooded area with a fatal gunshot wound to the rear of his head.

A 37-year-old master police officer with the Virginia Beach Police Department, with 9 years of law enforcement experience, was shot and killed while working as an undercover narcotics officer in a buy/bust operation on August 7 around 11:15 p.m. Several cover/take down detectives were assisting nearby, monitoring and observing the evening’s activities as the veteran officer met with an individual in the parking lot of a shopping center. The suspect entered the officer’s vehicle, and they discussed the possibility of a drug transaction. The man stated he did not have the drugs on him, but would get them and return shortly. Before leaving the vehicle on foot, the suspect “checked” to see if the undercover officer was a cop. The suspect walked a short distance away and was observed with a second individual. Approximately 10 minutes later, the suspect walked back to the officer’s vehicle and got in again. Within a few minutes, the second individual with whom the first suspect had met drove up in an SUV and pulled alongside the undercover officer’s vehicle. The driver of the SUV exited his vehicle and approached the driver’s side of the officer’s vehicle and began to shoot. The suspect fired three shots from a .40-caliber semiautomatic handgun, striking the officer in the arms/hands and, fatally, in the front upper torso/chest. The shooter was apprehended immediately at the scene by the cover/take down detectives; the first suspect fled but was pursued and apprehended by officers a short distance away. The victim officer was pronounced dead at the scene. The 26-year-old initial suspect, who had a prior criminal history, was charged with First-Degree Murder, Use of a Firearm to Commit a Felony, and Conspiracy to Violate Drug Control Act. The driver of the SUV and alleged shooter, a 23-year-old male who was under supervision/conditional release, was also charged with First-Degree Murder, Use of a Firearm to Commit a Felony, and Conspiracy to Violate Drug Control Act.

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Washington

On September 2, a 40-year-old deputy sheriff with the Skagit County Sheriff’s Department was killed in Alger while responding to a 911 call, and a 42-year-old trooper with the Washington State Patrol was injured in a vehicle pursuit involving the same suspect. The deputy, who had more than 6 years of law enforcement experience, arrived at the residence of the 911 caller around 3:30 p.m. The caller said her son was at a neighbor’s home and was acting strangely. The deputy drove to the neighbor’s home, and when the deputy knocked on the front door, a man opened the door and shot at her with a .44 magnum lever-action rifle. The deputy immediately returned fire from the top step near the door. The deputy retreated to her locked patrol car and finally to a nearby tree while returning fire. The deputy exhausted the ammunition in her three magazines, becoming incapacitated and unable to return fire. The suspect then approached her and shot her once in the head at close range. In addition to the fatal head wound, the deputy, who was wearing a protective vest, suffered 9 gunshot wounds to the front upper torso, below the waist, and in her arms/hands. The shooter continued his killing spree resulting in five dead and four wounded individuals. One of the wounded, a veteran Washington State trooper with 15 years of law enforcement experience, had responded to a request for assistance involving pursuit of the suspect’s vehicle just after 4:30 p.m. Planning to assist in pursuit from behind, the trooper mistakenly entered the highway in front of the alleged shooter’s vehicle. When the trooper learned that the suspect was being followed by an unmarked patrol vehicle, he slowed to try to let the truck pass, but the driver of the truck also slowed. The trooper then accelerated ahead of the truck and as he did, the driver fired a round from his rifle, striking the trooper in his left arm above the elbow. The trooper drove himself to a local hospital where he received treatment. The 28-year-old assailant, who had a previous criminal history that included violent crime and drug violations, was apprehended and charged with six counts of First-Degree Murder and Assault.

A 51-year-old officer with the U.S. Forest Service in Vancouver was shot and killed while investigating a suspicious person near Sequim around 2:45 p.m. on September 20. The 21-year veteran of law enforcement was responding to a report of a suspicious man and a van without a license plate at a campground in Olympic National Forest. She notified Washington State Patrol dispatch that she was going to be out of her vehicle talking with a man she believed was associated with the van. She requested a driver’s check, and gave the name and date of birth that the man provided. The dispatcher advised the officer that the man was a convicted felon, had a temporary protection order and a no contact order placed against him, and that he was on parole. The officer acknowledged receipt of the message. The dispatcher attempted to contact the officer for an updated status but did not receive a response. Clallam County deputies and Washington State Patrol troopers responded to the area and found the victim officer lying in the woods at the side of the road below her marked patrol vehicle, which was still running with the emergency lights activated and her K-9 partner in the vehicle. The officer, who was wearing body armor, died of a gunshot wound to the side of the head from a handgun. Officers searched the area and found the suspect’s van abandoned several miles from the scene. Fliers of the suspect were posted around the community. Around 9 p.m. that evening, Clallam County deputies responded to a 911 call from employees at a local establishment who thought the suspect was inside their store. As two deputies arrived, the suspect was coming out of the front of the building. They ordered the man to stop, but he continued walking forward, reached to his waist, and pulled out a pistol. The deputies shot and killed the 36-year-old suspect. Further investigation revealed that the suspect had also killed a second victim, a recently retired correctional officer who was shot to death and whose vehicle was found at the store where deputies had killed the suspect.

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