Table contents
Table 72
Table 73
Table 74
Table 75
Table 76
Table 77
Table 78
Table 79

 

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Section I Officers Feloniously and Accidentally Killed | Section II Officers Assaulted

Section III

Federal Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted

 

Methodology

The UCR Program provides statistics in Sections I and II of this publication regarding all law enforcement officers feloniously or accidentally killed, as well as those assaulted. Section III provides information regarding federal officers who were killed and assaulted in the line of duty. The data pertain to federal officers who were employed by the following departments and agencies:   the U.S. Departments of Homeland Security, the Interior, Justice, and the Treasury; the U.S. Capitol Police; and the U.S. Postal Inspection Service. These federal entities employ most of the personnel who are responsible for protecting governmental officials and enforcing and investigating violations of federal laws. The FBI annually contacts these departments and requests information about the officers who were killed or assaulted in the line of duty.

The presentation of the information in this section regarding federal law enforcement officers killed and assaulted differs slightly from the presentation of data regarding assaults on local and state law enforcement officers in Section II. The data collected by the FBI from federal agencies include all reports of assaults or threats to assault, regardless of the extent or even the absence of personal injury. Further, circumstance categories are customized to describe the duties performed by federal law enforcement personnel.

Overview

In 2004, 681 federal law enforcement officers were assaulted, and 144 of these assaults resulted in injuries to the officers involved. The Department of Homeland Security employed 311 of the officers assaulted; the Department of the Interior employed 220; the Department of Justice, 115; the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, 23; the U.S. Capitol Police, 10; and the Department of the Treasury, 2 of the officers. (See Tables 72 and 73.)

Weapons

An examination of 2004 data concerning the use of weapons showed that personal weapons, such as hands, fists, or feet, were used in 263 of the attacks. In addition, 69 officers were attacked with firearms, 67 were assaulted with vehicles, 9 were assailed with knives or cutting instruments, 5 were struck with blunt instruments, 2 were attacked with bombs, and other dangerous weapons were used in 132 of the assaults. The data also showed that 134 of the officers were threatened by assailants. (See Table 74.)

Circumstances

A study of the circumstances in which federal officers were assaulted in 2004 showed that officers were most often performing patrol or guard duties when attacked. Nearly half of the victim officers (321 of the 681) were engaged in these tasks when assaulted. The remaining 360 officers were assaulted in the following situations:   137 officers were victimized when making arrests or serving summonses, 90 officers were assaulted while conducting investigations or searches, 41 were victimized when providing protection, 30 were attacked while having custody of prisoners, 14 officers were on office duty when assaulted, 4 officers were on court duty, and 44 officers were assigned to other duties when attacked. (See Table 78.)

Regional Breakdowns

In order to analyze data geographically, the UCR Program divides the United States into four regions:  the Northeast, the Midwest, the South, and the West. In 2004, 297 federal officers were assaulted in the West. In the South, 218 officers were assaulted; in the Midwest, 120; and in the Northeast, 43 federal officers were assaulted. The U.S. Territory of Puerto Rico had 3 federal officers assaulted during the year. (See Table 76.)

Alleged Assailants

A total of 630 alleged assailants were identified in connection with the 681 assaults on federal officers in 2004. (See Table 72.)   Although the disposition information for nearly half of these alleged assailants was not provided, of the known dispositions, 110 assailants were prosecuted and found guilty of the assault, 93 alleged assailants were awaiting trial at the time of the publication, prosecution was declined for 72 of the alleged assailants, and prosecutive opinion was pending for 30. For 8 of the alleged assailants, charges were dismissed or subjects were found not guilty, and 5 of the assault suspects were deceased. In addition, 2 alleged assailants were found incompetent to stand trial and 7 remain at large. (See Table 79.)

Five-Year Totals

A study of data collected in the past five years showed that from 2000 through 2004, 1 federal officer was slain, and 2,610 officers were assaulted. The slain officer, who was killed in 2002, was a ranger with the National Park Service. (See Table 74.)

 

Summary of Assaults by Department

 

Department of Homeland Security (DHS)

The DHS provided 2004 assault data for 311 of its officers, 53 of whom suffered injuries  when they were attacked. Two of the injured officers, both employed by the Bureau of Customs and Border Protection, were assaulted by persons with firearms. By agency within the DHS, the Bureau of Customs and Border Protection employed 260 of the officers assaulted, and 45 of those officers suffered injuries. The Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement employed 29 of the officers who were assaulted; however, none of those officers sustained injuries. The U.S. Secret Service reported assaults on 22 of its officers, 8 of whom suffered injuries. (See Tables 72 and 73.)

A review of the data by type of assignment showed that of the 311 DHS officers that were assaulted, the majority, 273, were on patrol or guard duty at the time of the assaults. Thirty-one of the DHS officers assaulted were conducting investigations or searches, 2 were serving summonses or making arrests, and 1 had custody of a prisoner. In addition, 4 officers were assigned to other duties at the time they were assaulted. (See Table 78.)

The data collected concerning the type of weapons offenders used in assaults against DHS officers showed that 76 officers were attacked by persons using personal weapons, such as hands, fists, or feet. Forty-four officers were assaulted by offenders with firearms, 34 officers were threatened with attacks, and 33 were assaulted by persons using vehicles as weapons. Three DHS officers were struck by offenders using blunt instruments, 2 were the target of attacks by persons using bombs, and 1 officer was assaulted by an offender with a knife or cutting instrument. In addition, 118 officers were attacked by persons with other dangerous weapons. (See Table 75.)  

Law enforcement identified 351 suspects in the assaults against 311 DHS officers. At the time of this publication, the dispositions of 303 of the suspects were not available. Of the 48 persons for which disposition information was available, prosecution was declined for 27. Nine suspects were pending prosecution, 6 were found guilty, 3 were awaiting trial, and 1 was found not guilty or the charges were dismissed. Two alleged assailants remained fugitives at the time this book was published. (See Tables 72 and 79.)

 

Department of the Interior (DOI)

In 2004, the DOI provided information on 220 of its officers who were assaulted; 51 of those officers suffered injuries as a result of the attacks. Within the DOI, the National Park Service reported assaults on 111 of its officers, 33 of whom sustained injuries. The Bureau of Indian Affairs employed 108 officers who were assaulted, and 17 of those officers were injured. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reported that 1 of its employees was injured during an assault. (See Tables 72 and 73.)

An examination of the data regarding the type of activity in which DOI officers were involved at the time of the assaults showed that 104 officers were making arrests or serving summonses. Forty-two officers were on patrol or guard duty at the time of the attacks, 37 were providing protection, 22 were conducting investigations or searches, 10 had custody of prisoners, and 3 officers were assigned to office duty at the time of the assaults. Two of the officers assaulted were assigned to other duties. (See Table 78.)

By weapon type, nearly half, 120, of the DOI officers assaulted were attacked by persons using personal weapons, such as hands, fists, or feet. In addition, 54 officers were threatened, 19 officers were assaulted by persons using vehicles as weapons, 9 were assaulted by offenders with firearms, 7 were attacked by persons with knives or cutting instruments, and 2 officers were assaulted by offenders using blunt instruments. Nine officers were attacked by persons using other dangerous weapons. (See Table 75.)

Law enforcement identified 193 suspects in connection with the attacks against the 220 DOI officers. Ninety-seven of the suspects were tried and found guilty, 66 persons were awaiting trial at the time of this publication, 17 were pending prosecution, and 4 were tried and found not guilty or the charges were dismissed. Prosecution was declined in the cases of 4 suspects, and 1 suspect was deceased. Four of the alleged assailants remained at large at the time of this publication. (See Tables 72 and 79.)

 

Department of Justice (DOJ)

In 2004, the DOJ provided assault information on 115 of its officers, 29 of whom suffered injuries as a result of the assaults and 4 of whom were attacked by offenders with firearms. Fifty of the officers assaulted were employed by the U.S. Marshals Service, and 24 of those officers suffered injuries in the attacks. Thirty-three of the officers who were assaulted worked for the Drug Enforcement Administration, and 3 of those officers were injured, each by persons with firearms. Twenty-nine victim officers were employed by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and 3 worked for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF). The FBI and ATF each had one officer suffer injuries in the assaults; the ATF officer who was injured was assaulted by a person with a firearm. (See Tables 72 and 73.)

By type of assignment, 32 of the 115 DOJ officers who were assaulted were conducting investigations or searches at the time they were attacked, 20 officers were making arrests or serving summonses, and 18 had prisoners in custody. Four officers were assigned to court duty, and 4 were providing protection at the time they were assaulted. Thirty-seven of the officers assaulted were assigned to other duties. (See Table 78.)

 A review of the data concerning the type of weapons assailants used against DOJ officers showed that offenders used personal weapons, such as hands, fists, or feet to attack 46 officers. Persons threatened violence towards 43 officers. Offenders used vehicles as weapons to assault 12 officers and firearms to assault another 12. A knife or cutting instrument was used by an offender to assault 1 officer, and another type of dangerous weapon was used by an offender to attack another officer. (See Table 75.)

Through investigations, law enforcement identified 57 suspects in the assaults of the 115 DOJ officers.  Of the 57 suspects, prosecution was declined for 34. Eight suspects were awaiting trial at the time of this publication, 4 were pending prosecutive opinion, and 4 were deceased. Four suspects were tried (2 were found guilty, and 2 were found not guilty or had their charges dismissed). Two suspects were found incompetent to stand trial. A suspect in the assault of a DOJ officer remained a fugitive at the time this book was published. (See Tables 72 and 79.)

 

Department of the Treasury (DOT)

In 2004, the DOT reported that 2 of its officers were assaulted. Both officers were employed by the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration; both were threatened by their offenders, but neither officer suffered injuries. (See Tables 72, 73, and 75.)  The data showed that by type of assignment, 1 officer was conducting an investigation or search, and the other officer was making an arrest or serving a summons at the time each was attacked. (See Table 78.)

Law enforcement officers apprehended 2 suspects in connection with the assaults on the 2 DOT officers. One suspect was tried and found guilty, and the other did not go to trial because prosecution was declined. (See Tables 72 and 79.)

 

U.S. Capitol Police

In 2004, the U.S. Capitol Police reported that 10 of its officers were assaulted. Three of the officers suffered injuries during the attacks. (See Tables 72 and 73.)

At the time of the assaults, 7 officers were performing arrests or serving summonses, 2 were on patrol or guard duty, and the other officer had custody of prisoners. By weapon type, 5 of the victim officers with the U.S. Capitol Police were attacked by offenders who used personal weapons, such as hands, fists, or feet. One officer was assaulted by a person who used a vehicle as a weapon, another was attacked by a person with a firearm, and yet another was threatened by an assailant. Two officers were assaulted by persons with other dangerous weapons. (See Tables 75 and 78.)

Law enforcement identified 10 suspects in connection with the assaults on the 10 U.S. Capitol Police officers. Six of the suspects were awaiting trial at the time of this publication, and prosecution was declined for the other 4. (See Tables 72 and 79.)

 

U.S. Postal Inspection Service

Twenty-three officers with the U.S. Postal Inspection Service were assaulted in 2004. Eight of the officers assaulted suffered injuries as a result of the assaults, 1 by an offender with a firearm. (See Tables 72 and 73.)

By type of assignment, the data revealed that 11 of the officers were on office duty at the time they were assaulted. Four officers were conducting investigations or searches, and 4 more were on patrol or guard duty. Three officers were making arrests or serving summonses when they were attacked, and 1 officer was assaulted while performing other duties. (See Table 78.)

Sixteen of the victim officers with the U.S. Postal Inspection Service were attacked by offenders using personal weapons, such as hands, fists, or feet. Three of the officers assaulted were attacked by persons with firearms, 2 were assaulted by offenders who used vehicles as weapons, and 2 officers were attacked by offenders with other dangerous weapons. (See Table 75.)

Through investigations, 17 suspects were identified by law enforcement in connection with the assaults on the 23 officers with the U.S. Postal Inspection Service. Ten suspects were awaiting trial at the time of publication, and 4 were tried and found guilty. Prosecution against 2 suspects was declined, and the remaining suspect was tried but found not guilty. (See Tables 72 and 79.)

 

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